The consequences of refusal

I’ve written previously about “chicken pox parties”. These types of events are coming back into vogue (they were common in the days before the vaccine, when the only way to provide immunity was to be infected), as parents mistakenly believe that “natural exposures” to these pathogens are somehow superior–and safer–than vaccinations. Though the latest rage are “H1N1 parties”, chicken pox parties are still around, and potentially being held at your local McDonald’s by families connecting on the internet:

I am trying to put together a chicken pox party and am looking for someone to donate their chickenpox to the event.
I was thinking of having it at McDonald or some place with toys to play on.
if you know anyone who would like to contribute or would like more information on a time and place let me know.

This is, again, one of my biggest problems with those who refuse vaccines. They frame the issue as solely “my child, my choice.” Which is fine, until you put that child in with the rest of society via school, or daycare, or even trips to McDonald’s. These interactions include infants who are too young to get vaccinated; people with chronic conditions or who are receiving chemotherapy, and are therefore more susceptible to disease; or those in whom the vaccine just didn’t “take” (my own measles titers were not high enough to be protective, I learned last year when I was preparing to go to Mongolia–despite having 2 doses of the vaccine), and on and on. Yes, you have the right to make decisions for your child–but parents should realize that this particular choice can put a lot of others in danger.